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Asheville School History and Architecture Discussed

By Dasha Morgan

Tom Marberger, a graduate of Asheville School and a semi-retired administrator, will be speaking about the history and architecture of the Asheville School. The talk began at 10:00AM on Saturday, October 19th in the school’s chapel. Founded in 1900, Asheville School is a co-education school with grades 9th through 12th with approximately 295 students from 16 states and 18 countries. Eighty percent of Asheville School students board, and 20% are day students. In 2018 Architectural Digest named Asheville School “the most beautiful private high school in North Carolina.”

The Asheville School is a private, coeducational, University-preparatory boarding school in Asheville with Dr. Anthony Sgro the ninth Head of School. The majority of Asheville School graduates attend colleges and universities Barron’s rates as “highly selective” or “most selective.”
The Asheville School is a private, coeducational, University-preparatory boarding school in Asheville with Dr. Anthony Sgro the ninth Head of School. The majority of Asheville School graduates attend colleges and universities Barron’s rates as “highly selective” or “most selective.”

Marberger will focus on core structures completed by 1930, history and key architectural highlights. Built in the Tudor Style the 300 acres face Mount Pisgah and were landscaped by Chauncey Beadle of the Biltmore Estate. He will speak in the historic art deco “William Spencer Boyd Chapel.” Those attending will enjoy that historic setting and the stunning stained glass windows designed by William Waldo Dodge. Following the talk the campus will be open for those who wish to walk or drive through it, and the main building will be open for viewing.

This program is part of the Preservation Society of Asheville Buncombe County’s October Education Event and is sponsored by Brunk Auctions. More details can be found at PSABC.org. A suggested donation of $10.00 will help support local preservation.

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